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20121027
20121104
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 22
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
begin with the qstion that haunts our time -- why in a nation as rich as america, has the economy stopped working for people at-large even as those at the top enjoy massive rewards? the struggle of ordinary people for a decent living, for security, is as old as the republic, but it's taken on a new and urgent edge. instead of shared prosperity, our political system has now produced a winner-take-all economy. >> how ch is enough, gordon. >> hollywood saw it coming.ho >> the richest 1% of this country owns half of our country's wealth -- $5 trillion. one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds cmes frome inheritance. interest interest accumulating to widows' idiot sons. andre what i do -- stock the re estate speculation. it's [ bleep ] >> you got 90% of the american people have little or noet worth. i create nothing -- i own.o we make the rules, pal. the news, war, peace, famine, upheaval -- the price of a paper clips. we pull the rabb out of the hat while everybody else sits there wondering how in the [ bleep ] we did it. now, you're not my ev enough to think we're living a
u.s. economy picks up steam thanks to sp. ding by consumers and the government. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. we take you to a wells fargo event in chicago, where housing grants could turn renters into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries,o tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset manament joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."!me >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by conumers, the federal government and the housing c sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post gr
been provided by:n ♪  ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedited to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public badcasting. and by contributions to your pbb station from viewers like you. thank you. >>thrown: an important snapshot of the country's economic growth was released today, a week and a half before the election. with positive, but still slow, improvement, the white house aro the romney campaign offered different assessments. a latboost in consumer spending was a major factor in the economic news from the bocommerce department. gross domestic product-- the broadest gauge of the country'so economic health-- great a 2%% rate from july though september, slightly better than the 1.8% economists had predicted, and an improvement over the 1.3% growth in the previous quarter. another positive si today-- a survey fro
an economy in need of a spark find one in octob? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state,tarting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression.at and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.
's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be rue in this case? >> well, no. this is a natural disaster. disasters are bad for the economy. obviously, the big hit tohe economy initially, is what we're seing in new york. nd do get rebuilding, economy benefits from that, but net, net, the economy is in a worse place. natural disasters are bad for the economy, not good. >> susie: you heard in erica's remit some businesses t are going to a benefit, maybe hox*echl builders and cuk companies. if you look at the economy, who are the winners and losers in terms of various sectors? >> well,erehere's more losers than winners. the losers would he the restaurants, they're not going to serve meals that aren't getting served. airlines, trucking companies, you know, the casinos fnlt fshs services. and ncretaried to trading is shut down for a couple of days, never get that back. the winners are clear. the homebuilders, home improvemt, you mentioned home depot and loews and hardware stores. online retailers might benefit because department storesov are closed. so some winners, but on net, more
optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new claims for unemployment insance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing modest improvement in the jobs picture. we'll have more on jobs in a moment. as for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was upel 42, the s&pdding 15.15 >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey andew york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have re ad atme all of the airports in the new york area.at public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do no
, and return to normal production and slightly bigger hit on the economy. s this's certainly true. >> tom: what about the impact on the job market. we were supposed to have the october jobs numbers this friday. still expected to come out. notoing to be impacted because of this storm but what about november's numbers? >> that's a great question. sometime these major events,oi those storms are right in the middle of the reference period during which bls measures employment. but sandy is occurrin almost directly between october's referen month and november's reference month, actually-- impact of this on the official government numbers for employment. >> tom: just 20 seconds left but damage to confidence at all, consumer confidence? >> no, i think not. people are resilient. they will see through this. they'll get back to the business of rebuilding which of course is a plus for gdp and back to that activity very quicy. >> we hope it happens faster than not. joeling prakken with u a look at the economy, macroeconomic advisors. it may seem bit premature to talk about the stock mar's reaction to hurri
, so it's not been a great improvement in the economy. we've had a very -- >>ity an indicator of which way the economy is -- is it an indicator of which way the economy is going? >> it has not healed enough, when you take into fact we spent $4.5 trillion in deficit recovery,. >> and an improvement ratio? >> not improving. >> not on that path. >> it's not on that path. >> is it an aberration? >> bureau of labor stats on this. have you requested them? >> yes, they don't tell you a lot of things. like the labor force participation rate. which has dropped toyorelatively low numbers, which makes the unemployment numbers lo better. >> in hindsight, when he critizes the last month's report. >> last month in crthe last month's report, the only reason that number got better was 582 people thousand left e the calculation, and went to work on a part-time basis, so the part-time jobs got better, bu we did not, they took these people out of ofthe denominator. >> those numbers are not that -- >> nay says finish? >> we're being accurate. >> i would say that's the nay-ers. if you look at the economy,
it up one word. it's the economy. filipino republicans or maybe filipinos who have been democrats in the past or have not supported the gop are taking a second look because they have four years. the but filipino democrats are also arguing, it's intergenerational. >> belva: let's talk about another group. jobs for african-americans, particularly males, poverty rate going up. nothing from those groups in terms of complaints? >> the unemployment numbers of african-american groups definitely being reported about widely, highest since thgreat depression. what ourgr african-american med monitor base in washington, d.c. was able to glean from newspapers like "the washington afro," the range of black media, you can see from the endorsements, you can see from the kind of reporting they're doing, there is more of an openness in the african-american community recognize that president obama inherited two wars and a cruling economy and that they are willing -- they c recognize that four years was not enough of a timetable and they are lwilling to let him attempt to turn it around. >> how muc
the american economy and essentially saved it by kicking out all of these good-for-nothing ceos and making companies, once again, economically efficnt and productive. these folks think they're heroes and they saved america. and the public thinks they are villains and their whole job is to enrich themselves and destroy jobs. >> narrator: the aftermath of some of the leveraged buyout deals was devastating: bankruptcies, factory closures, employees laid off. >> bain capital was never set up to ba job creation program. it was set up to make wealthy incrstors even wealthier. they didn't sit around the tablt talking about how many jobs this would create. ntimes it was the opposite, how many jobs could be cut to make the company more efficient. >> mitt is a person who wants to be successful. making money is how you're measured in the private equity and venture capital business, i but you're making money for your investors first and foremost, and that was always mitt's focus was to make money for them. >> narrator: the way those closest to him tell it, he hadt come to see himself as a white h knig
going to get the mon that weweeed in a way thatee won't tank the economy, that will incease the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing a the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that ndidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment e.values had something to do wi this? >> well, i think sus ense was what was required down to the wire. s and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. then a coue of draws. what could be better for keepie people watching? unfortunately, the lack of an e answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is reason , to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between
been created because he wants us to feel better about the economy than the data would actually warrant. governor romney wants to feature everything that's negative, without acknowledging anything that's posietve about the economy.ve and if people feature one of those indictments without picking up the other compensatory body of information, they don't have the whole picture. the reality is the onomic indicators right now are mixed. and you have a new obama ad on the air that's trying to feature the ones that are positive in order to increase the likelihood that you think about those as you ask whether or not the country is better off now than it would've been, had obama not been president. we were in a deep recession. and president obama's having the difficulty of having to make the argument that, "things are better than they would have been, had i not done what i have done." but they're still not what they ought to be. and that's a tough case for the incumbent. and governor romney's exploiting it every inch of the way. >> my favorite whopper was when paul ryan said that the reason tha
to get this economy gointa >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, benning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a, six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs our has been provided by: ou ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other w
has been provided by: di ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. io >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some ples. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really un
is about a lot of things, the economy, jobs, taxes but also about real leadership, and this week that'sio what l has been thinking about, authenticity. here is author and educator, lou heckler. >> on a recent trip, my wife and i attended a church service where the sermon was about authenticity. it got me thinking about the best boss i ever had. this gentleman had thatauare ability to be squarely in charge and yet make you feel like he always had your back. he demanded much of those of us working for him and was equally generous with rewards for a job well done. if you made an error he was concerned but forgiving and particularly focused on the lessons you learned. better still, we all knew this wasn't just what he did, it was who he was. ward schultz, founder of starbucks says it this way: authentic brands don't emerge ing cubicles orma advertising agencies. they emanate from everything the company does. if you have customers or employees, how would they rate your company's authenticity? the old phrase "fake it until you make it" may work in some situations, but not in this arena. i'm
people working and grow the economy? how are we going to address the housing crisis and what are you gointo do togo protect medicare and social security? i have strong positions on those issues. my opponent does not. >> reporter: tarkanian has benefited from his family's well known name here but failed to win an election in three prior attempts at public office. he has his own take on this race. >> i've tried very hard to get out to all the different areas within the community. i've had business h meetings. i've had meetings with business leaders in theti african-americn community talking about businesses who are there and how we can help them get started and expand. at the same time i've been out in areas talking to the onion farmers and some of the ranchers about the issues they're dealing with with workers and so forth. i've tried very hard to be a go representative and good a good understanding of what's r important for those constituent >> reporter: in august the campaign was infused with racial tension when tarkanian seemed to suggest that horsford was relying on his own ethni
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)